Semi-Private Training at Anytime Fitness Dumas

Anytime Fitness Dumas is the go-to spot for semi-private training! Why is this such a great option for our members? Some of the many benefits include:

  • More Personal Attention
  • Affordable
  • Variety
  • Camaraderie
  • Motivation
  • Support
  • Accountability
  • Fun!

Semi-private training programs are designed for 2-4 people and meet 1X or 2X a week. Clients can have additional DIY workouts sent to them through the TrueCoach app, which includes a video library of exercises.

Current offerings at Anytime Fitness:

Tiny Vikings: Big and tall, we bring it all! Fight hard to lose weight, increase strength and endurance.

Kick-start Core: Kick your fitness into high gear with this intro to cardio kickboxing. Focus on core strength and mobility training.

Silver Strong: Specialized training for seniors who want to increase strength, flexibility, and balance.

Plus+ Strong: Whole-body strength and mobility training for weight loss. We move quickly between exercises for cardiovascular benefits.

Commit 2B Fit: Nothing can stop us! Strength and mobility training for people who are working with past injuries.

All training sessions are Level 1-2 (Beginner/Intermediate)

As the Head Fitness Consultant it is a blessing to work with such fantastic people! I am amazed at the progress my clients have made in three short months. They give me goosebumps!

Interested in joining one of these semi-private training programs, or would you like to form your own team? Contact me today to book a free fitness consultation.

Client FAQ: What is the best way to lose weight?

Many of my clients want to lose weight and weight loss is one of the main reasons why people exercise. But not all exercise programs are created equally and produce various results. The saying “work smarter, not harder” definitely applies to weight loss strategies.

I find that it’s helpful to start by explaining the difference between exercise and recreation. Exercise (a.k.a. strength training) is a process where the body performs demanding work in a clinically controlled environment. Recreation (biking, hiking, swimming, yoga, golf, etc.) is for mental health purposes whereas exercise is purely physical.

Recreation is for fun. Exercise is for strength.

Exercise will contribute to the performance of any recreational activity, through improved strength, endurance and resistance to injury. I compare this relationship to the structure of a house. Exercise is the foundation while recreation is the enjoyment that comes from having a kitchen, a bedroom, a living room, and so on.

Exercise is like balancing your budget. Not much fun but it’s absolutely essential.

Traditionally, cardio has been the focus of weight loss efforts. But studies have shown that dozens of hours of running or aerobic activities will only lead to small amounts of weight loss.

When combined with calorie restriction, a.k.a. improved dietary choices, better results were achieved with cardio. However, some of that weight loss was due to a loss of lean body mass rather than fat loss.

In a recent study with over 4,000 participants, the best results for weight loss were achieved through a combination of strength training and calorie restriction. And while exercise may not be as enjoyable as recreation, the good news is that short bursts of intense exercise can effectively boost your metabolism.

It is possible to lose weight in as little as 20 minutes.

To learn about additional ways to lose fat please read: Strength Training for Fat Loss, Exercise & Ways to Lose Fat

The journey to fat loss can be incredibly empowering! Do you want to lose weight? I would love to help you with achieving your goals. Contact me to schedule your free initial consultation.

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Anytime Fitness – Head Fitness Consultant in Dumas, Texas

I am delighted to announce my new position at Anytime Fitness in Dumas, Texas! When I lived on the Western Slope, I was an Anytime Fitness member in Montrose, Colorado and I absolutely loved it!

The Anytime in Dumas is a wonderful facility that has state-of-the art equipment (Precor is my jam!). It also has a great heavy bag, showers, and lots of natural lighting. The gym is very clean and well-maintained, and is considered to be the go-to spot in town (second only to the Toppled Turtle).

Just like Snap Fitness, Anytime is open 24/7 with key fob access. I love the convenience of being able to go to the gym whenever I want. Some days I want to feel the pulse of a packed gym, and there are other times when I want my own personal playground.

Right now I am training clients at Anytime Fitness on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

It’s an honor to be working with such AMAZING people! I am so inspired to help them reach their fitness goals.

I am also starting to offer fitness consultations on Wednesdays and Saturdays. This is a great opportunity for new members to experience the many benefits of personal training. From now until May 2nd, it’s only $1 to join.

Stay tuned for specialized semi-private training offerings (coming soon!)

The Perfect Workout: 1-on-1 Slow-Motion Strength Training

Since graduating in December, I’ve started working as a Virtual Trainer with a company called The Perfect Workout. They have been in business since 1999 all across the US and have been offering Virtual Training since March of 2020.

The first time I tried the Super Slow method I knew that this was the missing piece of my fitness regimen! This science-backed system is based on a study by the University of Florida to help post-menopausal women create bone density.

Not only is The Perfect Workout safe and highly effective for seniors, it’s incredibly challenging for adults of all ages and ability levels.

Since I became a Perfect Workout Trainer, I’ve been learning all about why people LOVE the Super Slow method and Virtual Training. This is just a snapshot of what so many clients have shared with me:


“I love the convenience of Virtual Training. I save myself an hour by not having to drive back and forth to the studio!”


“The Perfect Workout has completely changed the way that I look at exercise.”


“Virtual Training is harder than the studio workouts!”

Many of you know that I’ve been a Slow Philosophy advocate for a very long time. I am delighted to be able to incorporate my training background with this brilliant system. And I would love to share the many benefits of The Perfect Workout with you.

Sign up for my VIP Newsletter to receive a FREE 1-hour Intro Session (normally $75). Offer expires March 19th.

To learn more about this revolutionary form of exercise visit: Is Virtual Personal Training Worth It?

The Slow Path is the Best Way

One of my favorite mantras, or quotes that I live by is, “The slow path is the best way.” For me, this speaks to the value of doing things consistently over time for lasting, optimal results. I see the slow path as a lifestyle; a commitment to staying on course rather than expecting immediate results. 

The slow path (evolution) takes time. 

It took me a while to appreciate the slow path. When I started on this journey over twenty years ago, I was attracted to physically demanding dance, yoga, and martial arts practices.

I didn’t have much patience and the thought of meditating made me nervous. I could only manage to meditate for a few minutes after I’d exhausted myself in a power yoga class. Occasionally, I injured myself due to a lack of awareness of my body and improper form.

In 2004 I moved from New York to Boulder, Colorado. Even though I didn’t know anyone there, I felt that this move was important for my evolution. I began studying Tai Chi which became my formal introduction to the slow path. 

In the movie The Matrix there are different scenes where time slows down. Learning Tai Chi was a similar experience, as it felt like everything slowed down. I became aware of every single pedestrian movement and layers of body armor started to melt away. 

I had no idea how much stress I was holding until I slowed down.

Studying Tai Chi helped me discover new ways of tuning into my body. While I still enjoyed pushing myself physically, my internal awareness increased significantly. For the first time I was able to settle into meditation. 

A few years later I was awarded a modeling scholarship by the Rolf Institute of Structural Integration. Rolfing is a form of intensive bodywork that involves manipulating the body’s deep connective tissues for enhanced structural alignment. It’s a form of non-invasive reconstructive surgery.

Since I was actively involved in yoga community, the Rolfing school was interested to see how I would respond to the Ten Series. The Ten Series consists of ten, 2-hour long sessions that focus on freeing restrictions or holding patterns in particular regions of the body.

Rolfing is incredibly intense work, and I would leave each session feeling so exhausted that I would have to lie down for an hour afterwards. The work was targeting various imbalances in my body due to a mild scoliosis, many of which I had never been aware of.  

Much like the effect of Tai Chi, everything slowed down. 

Experiencing the Ten Series showed me how the scoliosis had affected various parts of my body. As I walked through the grocery store after having my feet worked on, I realized that my right foot had been always been partially supinated (when your foot rolls out). 

It felt like I was learning how to walk all over again.

By the end of the series my posture had improved and I even grew a little taller. My yoga practice slowed down and I was able to tune in on what was happening in each pose with greater clarity. Forward bends like Downward Dog became increasingly therapeutic.

This experience opened the door for me to establish my Qigong practice. In 2014 I moved back to New York where I began learning this form of internal martial arts. Standing qigong involves holding postures for 30-60 minutes at a time.

Through consistent practice, I’m able to use this technique for maintaining my spinal imbalances. It took a lot of patience to get to this point. It also helped me navigate the challenges I faced when I moved back to Colorado.

I am very excited to share the next evolution of my journey on the slow path. The best way to stay up-to-date about these new developments is to join my newsletter.

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Mind Your Feet

Boxing with Jordan at Snap Fitness PW

For the past three months I’ve been taking the Monday night Boxing class at Snap Fitness in Pueblo West, CO. Before studying with Jordan I had no formal training and didn’t really know what to expect. I was training myself for the 22 Push Ups Challenge and looking for ways to increase my upper body strength.

Jordan has developed a method that is based on his own training. For the first few weeks I was the only attendee and was very fortunate to receive 1:1 coaching. That level of personalized attention gave me a solid foundation, and I got a taste of how intense that cardiovascular workout can be.

Once I got past the initial learning curve, my body started to acclimate to the sequencing of the drills. And it was very good for my brain to go outside of my movement comfort zone.

I’ve learned that boxing is like ballet, golf, and target practice.

In ballet you learn how to perform various sequences, or what I call “movement puzzles.” Once you put all of the pieces of a boxing drill together, the feeling of connection is much like the zen quality of archery or hitting a long drive.

That powerful feeling is pretty amazing, and when a drill becomes second nature it’s a lot like dancing. It’s also a form of mind-body exercise.

From the yogic perspective, high-energy exercise is an excellent way to engage with the manipura chakra.

In a nutshell, the manipura (a.k.a. solar plexus) chakra is the will-power center of the subtle body. When performed mindfully, exercises like push-ups, kickboxing, and core-work provide a physical way of engaging with this center.

Anodea Judith’s book, Eastern Body, Western Mind is a great resource for learning more about chakra psychology.

There have been days where I’ve had to tap into my will-power center in order to make it to class. Jordan is always very understanding when I tell him I’m tired and he adjusts his format accordingly.

But there are also days when I surprise myself by having more energy than I anticipated. It’s like I always tell people – it’s all about showing up.

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Master’s Thesis – Kaleidoscopic Katas

Short form of the Wudang Five Animals Qigong

Master’s Thesis – Kaleidoscopic Katas: An Intercultural Somatic Curriculum for Holistic Health

I am overjoyed to announce that my thesis has been approved by the University of Northern Colorado. I have been working towards my Master’s in Dance Education for the past two and a half years. Here is the link to the online publication:

Kaleidoscopic Katas: An Intercultural Somatic Curriculum for Holistic Health

I don’t expect that many people will read all ninety-nine pages of my thesis, but you may find parts of it interesting. Attempting to complete this rigorous program during COVID has been one of the most challenging things that I’ve ever done. I could not have accomplished this goal without the help of the people who I’ve listed on the Acknowledgements page.

The YouTube video is from the final class of the Zoom teaching research workshop.

Abstract

The intent of this research study was to combine three African and Eastern somatic movement practices into a modern dance curriculum. Few studies have investigated the therapeutic value of subtle body awareness in a dance class context. This integrative study combined psychological, physiological, and contemplative pedagogical approaches, which led to the development of a comprehensive five-part workshop with five adult participants. This ten-hour online class series involved learning a traditional Afro-Haitian serpent dance called the Yanvalou, the Tantric practice of Chakra Yoga, and the Five Animals qigong. The original curricular goal was to combine these three modalities into five sequential katas. Due to numerous COVID-related setbacks, the researcher modified the curriculum and examined the relationships within this trinity of movement forms. The following qualitative instruments were used in this multimethod research study: reflective journal entries, participant commentary, a post-study rubric, video documentation, and the researcher’s observations. Pre- and post-surveys were used for quantitative data collection and were cross-referenced for the purpose of identifying emergent themes. The combined result of this data provided evidence of holistic health enhancement, personal empowerment, and altered states of consciousness. This study advanced the somatic application of the Yanvalou by exploring its relationship to the chakras and qigong meditation techniques. It also informed the continued development of a contemplative curriculum that could be utilized by post-secondary institutions.

22 Push Ups in 22 Days

I just completed my first 22 Push Ups Challenge. This viral campaign started in 2013 to raise awareness for Veteran suicide prevention. The number 22 is based on a VA study about the number of Veterans who commit suicide every day.

The 22 Push Ups Challenge is also for honoring military service members and Veterans. Various organizations promote this activity during the month of November to commemorate Veteran’s Day.

This goal has been on my bucket list for a long time.

The terms of the challenge vary, just depending on how each person chooses to complete it. Some people practice 22 push ups throughout a single day. Other people practice 22 push ups (and/or variations) at one time. While some people dedicate one day to the challenge, others perform 22 push ups for 22 days. Everyone posts a video of their efforts on their social media.

I’ve tried this challenge in the past and failed, due to a herniated disc injury from 2015. It took many years to rebuild my body, but through consistent effort I built up the strength to do ten triceps push ups in a row.

My goal was to do 22 consecutive triceps push ups in full plank position.

In order to more than double my number of pushups I had to do quite a bit of base and cross-training. Before the November 1st start date, I spent six weeks focusing on foundation. During the seventh week I increased my upper body training frequency by alternating my standard routine with Ballet Barre push up variations.

I also added some explosive strength training.

I started attending boxing classes once a week and also practiced on my own. This was my first attempt at boxing and it has been wonderfully challenging. I can understand why boxing is considered to be a form of mindful exercise.

In order to stay on course I used a training technique from my first 100 Days of Meditation marathon. I made a promise to myself that if I missed a day I would have to start over. I also made sure to stick to my clean eating routine and slept an average of eight hours every night.

You are welcome to learn more about my progress on my Facebook page.

Interested in taking your training to the next level? Book a free no-obligation consultation to discuss how I can help you reach your goals.

Five Animals Qigong Online Class Series

In this 3 min video I share a little of the history of the Five Animals and play with the first animal form ~ Dragon

Registration is now open for this lively 5-part series of adult martial arts classes. The Five Animals is a dance-like form of medical qigong. Qigong translates as qi (life force energy) and gong (cultivation practices). The purpose of the Five Animals is to enhance health and longevity. These low-impact movements increase strength, flexibility, and balance. Each class will focus on learning one of the animal forms.

Level: Beginner/Intermediate
Cost: $25 for the series
Minimum 3 people/Max 10
When: Mondays, Nov 15 – Dec 13
Time: 4pm PST/5pm MST/7pm EST (40 minutes)
Where: Zoom

What to Bring: Water bottle. Athletic wear. Tennis shoes or yoga mat. Insight Timer App installed on your phone.

Pre-registration is required and ends on November 14. Contact Emily to discuss payment options.

I reserve the right to cancel if less than 3 people sign up.

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Lineage Motif and Development by Emily Seymour

Kaleidoscopic Katas – 2021

Lineage Motif and Development – By Emily Seymour

This is the third video project that I just completed for my Masters in Dance Education. There were two parts to the assignment – the first involved researching one of my own lineage/heritage origins based on my self-identification.

I chose to research the paternal side of my ancestry. In speaking with my father about our family history, he said our family has been in the United States since before the Revolutionary War. He said my paternal bloodline is a combination of French, English and Irish.

To gain further clarity, I went about investigating the origins of my last name, Seymour. Before starting this project, all I knew was that my name involved a reference to water.

I took this opportunity to educate myself about the root of this side of my family tree. I discovered that the name Seymour has both Norman French and Anglo Saxon origins. In both instances my name relates to specific geographic locations.

The first is an abbey in the commune Saint-Maur des-Fosses in Northern France. This historical landmark is located about seven miles from the center of Paris. Saint Maur was a traveling monk who was renowned for his healing abilities. Les-Fosses means “the moats.”

The Marne river surrounds most of Saint Maur-des-Fosses. The abbey sits on the riverbanks and was founded in 638.

The name Seymour also has ties to two locations in North Yorkshire, both of which are named Seamer. The name Seamer predominantly translates as “lake by the sea.” This is a reference to a lake that used to be near a church.

In my research of these two locational names I learned that they both involve a religious site near a body of water.

The dance portion of the assignment had a “site-specific” requirement, meaning that I needed find a setting that represented my research. So I set out to find a suitable dance space near water, which was not as easy as you might think!

My company recently transferred me to Pueblo West, Colorado. I’ve been so busy here that I’ve had very little time for exploring. But this project was a good opportunity to learn more about this beautiful area.

I spent about seven hours at different places, including the gorgeous Xeriscape Garden at Cattail Crossings, Liberty Point above the Pueblo Reservoir, and Lake Pueblo State Park. All three of these sites were amazing but I decided to film at the Wildlife Area overlooking the reservoir.

Prior to this course, I had very limited video production skills. Due to my high learning curve, this might be the most challenging class that I’ve ever taken. There’s certainly more that I could do with developing my editing skills. Hopefully I’ll have a chance to work on this in some of the other beautiful spots in Pueblo West.

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